Category Archives: Excel in Law School

How to Ask for an Extension

So around finals time, we frequently find students asking for extensions, make-up exams, or other special circumstances.  I don’t know about others, but I have four criteria for what I consider a legitimate excuse:

  1. a reasonable excuse,
  2. supported by evidence,
  3. delivered politely,
  4. in a timely manner.

Let’s look at these.

  1. What is reasonable?  A medical emergency, a death in the family, that sort of thing.  A leisure tip is not a reasonable excuse in my book, nor is being tired or overwhelmed.  Read the syllabus on day one and calendar everything that is due well ahead of time. (Note: some professors are OK with other excuses; different people have different rules
  2. Supported by evidence?  Bring a doctor’s note or other document that backs up your excuse.  Not that we don’t trust you, but we may have to support our decision to grant you some exception to a rule that others have to follow.  It’s much easier for us to answer administrative concerns if you provide a doctor’s note, documents to prove the death, etc.
  3.  Delivered politely?  When I shared my list of four recently with school administrators, they were surprised.  Why?  So many people are rude and/or demanding.  But, this is an essential element of a valid request.  Say “Please.”  Address your professor as “Professor” –not “Hey” or “Dude” or “Mr.” or “Ms.”  And, ask, do not demand.
  4. Timely?  The earlier in advance the better.  Students who come in as soon as something happens, or in advance if it’s something that can be planned, are well served.  A student who comes in weeks or even months after a midterm, let’s say, and only then asks for a make up exam, loses all credibility.

When I shared my list of four recently with certain school administrators, they were surprised, especially by my insistence on respect.  But, asking politely to me seems the minimum when speaking to or writing to a professor.

The best plan, as always, is to calendar all deadlines at the beginning of the semester and comply with them.  But, sometimes things happen that are beyond your control.  What is within your control is how you handle them.

Follow these rules and you are on the road toward a successful request for an exception to the rules.

#Finals! What stands between you and all As on your final exams?

Interesting piece in the NY Times that made me think about the sorts of fears and other road blocks that get in between students and exam success. (“Time to Be Honest about the Fear that’s Getting in Your Way” by Carl Richards, April 17, 2017)

Let’s look at some possibilities:

  • I really do not love what I am studying and would rather spend time doing ________ [FILL IN THE BLANK] than studying.

Fear?  [For college students]: Maybe there is no major for me.  [For graduate students: Maybe I’ve chosen the wrong field. But what then?  I’ve put in so much time and money, how do I turn back or change things now?  I will incur more costs, more time, I’ll disappoint others….]   This is an issue, no doubt.  A couple of thoughts.  What do you love?  Can you articulate it?  Is there training to get a job that would involve doing what you love?  Also, remember, even work one “loves” is often hard.  If you are well into a course of study, think carefully before deciding something “isn’t for you” solely because you may be struggling.  If you are now just first deciding what to study, research what people do professionally with the degree you are seeking and see if any of it sounds appealing.  Go on informational interviews.  Talk with people.  Research.  You might find you were on a good path all along, or you might conclude that you do need to make a change. Bottom line here, the more strongly you believe you are on a positive path, the more likely you are to succeed in the various steps along that path.

  • I do not believe that the price I’d have to pay to get the best grades possible is worth it. Everyone says that no one in my generation will get jobs unless they are in STEM, so why bother.

Fear?  I won’t get a job.  True may of today’s college grads, and even law school grads, are having a harder time than in previous generations finding good jobs.  But there are still jobs.  And, the better your grades are the you are more likely to get one of them.  Instead of deliberately putting your head in the sand, or sabotaging yourself, make yourself the best possible stand-out graduate you can be. (Make an appointment with someone in your university’s career services center.)

  • If I really put in every ounce of energy and an immense amount of time and I still don’t do as well as I’d like, the “truth” will come out that I’m just not as smart as people think I am.  If I don’t put in that much, I can blame B’s, C’s, or D’s on something other than my own intelligence.

Fear?  I am not smart enough. OK, this is a layered and nuanced concern.  Some people are not suited for certain studies.  But being admitted to a degree program is at least one objective measure that you are capable.  Your grades are another measure.  But, sometimes grades are an indicator that you have to try a different approach or seek a different explanation.  Haven’t you ever had something just not make sense at all until that one moment when someone explained it in a different way, and “click,” -you got it?

Don’t let the fact that you haven’t yet figured something out push you into an imposter syndrome –where you fear you are not cut out for whatever you are seeking to accomplish. Instead of fearing you are not smart enough and falling into a self-fulfilling prophecy, try believing you are smart enough and find ways to live up to your high expectations.  Seek help. Try different ways to studying.  Experiment with different places to study.  Research learning science techniques.  Harness all the tools out there to help you become and stay your absolute best.  Look for articles, books, videos, professors, TA’s, tutors, academic support or writing centers to see if any of them can help you get it –maybe with a different approach.  There is a really good chance that persistence will pay off!

  • If I put in my all, I will do better than [FILL IN THE BLANK – perhaps this might include friends, siblings, or even parents.]  My success will make them jealous.

Fear?  I won’t be as well liked or loved if I show how smart I really am. OK, if the last point was nuanced, this one is even more complex –but oh so real for many people.  There are jealous people and those who are not supportive.  We could spend hours, days really, strategizing about how to handle this.  For now, think about it this way –no one has the right to diminish your potential.  And, certainly don’t let anyone into your head to keep you down before you’ve even given yourself the chance to soar.

Put this fear on hold. (Hit the pause button.) Do your best, succeed to the best of your ability, then deal with the fallout afterward.  What’s the worst that can happen?  You might lose friends. (If you lose a friend because he or she is jealous of your success, decide if you were best served by keeping such a person in your life anyway.)  You might alienate family.  (Ok, maybe. Sometimes people close to you are jealous or resent the time that your success takes you away from them.  But you can find tools to repair such relationships, especially if they are truly grounded in love.  Sometimes people need time and reassurance to know that your success will not diminish them or your relationship.)  And, you may be surprised and find some or all of those you thought would not be supportive are.  You may find people you thought would be jealous are immensely proud of you.

—–

Is there something standing between you and doing your best?  What is it?  Break it down. Look closely to see if there are underlying fears, and if so, can you work through them without sabotaging yourself.   Bottom line, struggling to do the best you can, in whatever you are studying at the moment, will give you more choices –even if you end up making a change.

Time Management Tips for Law Students who are Parents

Many students who are parents say they feel guilty that law school is taking them “away” from their kids. If your children are in elementary, middle or high-school, know that your studying is positive role modeling. You are teaching them discipline and the value of hard work through your actions. (Teaching is much more effective than preaching!)  Do not be surprised if your children do better in school when you too are studying.

The following are a few practical pointers:

  • If you have dependent children or aging parents who must be able to reach you in an emergency, give them a code or special ring tone for an emergency call or text. You’ll know if it’s something you need to read or listen right away or if it can wait until when you decide to take the study break you have earned by completing whatever tasks were on your schedule.
  • Keep “office hours” so your family knows when you are studying and not to be interrupted, and when you are available. Even if it’s an hour a day at dinner every night, keep your commitment to them. It is even more important when you are gone a lot to be consistent and reliable. If they know when they can depend on you to give them your full attention, (and you truly follow through on that, at one certain time each day), they may be better able to leave you alone the rest of the day.
  • Be sure to include your family (children, significant other, parents) where you can productively do so. When you take “breaks,” ask them to test you with flashcards. (Just be prepared, your kids may have memorized the rules before you do!)
  • Play audio versions of your lectures while you are driving, cooking, cleaning, or playing with kids.
  • Bring flashcards (or better still have them on your smart phone) to test yourself if you are at the park or waiting in line at the market.
  • If you have young children, read your outlines or cases aloud. Infants and toddlers mostly just want to hear your voice and be close to you. Whether you are reading Dr. Seuss, Shakespeare or Farnsworth on Contracts may not matter so much!

Excerpted from Pass the Bar Exam –a must-read for all law students.

 

 

Failing law schools and failing the bar exam

Who should read Pass the Bar Exam and why?

  • Law students!!  If you are in law school, this book is written for you and to you. It is an interactive guide. Think of it as talking with a mentor or supportive professor who is sharing advice, stories, worksheets, quizzes, and other planning tools to help you pass the bar exam. The best part is that these very same professional, life, and study skills will help far beyond bar prep. They will help you achieve most any goal you invest this kind of effort in. Knowing that the effort you put into bar passage will pay success dividends for decades to come should make the study process a much more rewarding one.  Read Pass the Bar Exam and get ready for a virtuous cycle of success, on the bar exam and beyond.
  • Families, friends, spouses, and partners of law students. Many of you are or will be confused and sometimes even offended by the behavior of your son, daughter, mom, dad, husband, wife, partner or friend. He or she seems inordinately stressed out, or has virtually disappeared. You can’t help but think, ‘How hard could law school be?’  And, ‘isn’t the bar just another test?’  This book will help you “get it.” As a key player in the support network of someone taking the bar exam, your help at this stage is critical. Learn what bar takers go through and how you can lend a hand and/or back off, as needed.
  • Law school deans, professors and administrators, particularly Academic Support (ASP) and Bar Support Faculty designing and teaching both for credit and extra-curricular bar success courses, in live and distance learning settings. For you, there is also a special Teacher’s Edition Guide, with lesson plans, syllabi, and an updated section on online bar support.  For law school deans, there is no more important, indeed existential, concern to your students than bar passage.  There are deep fears among today’s law students that the deck is stacked against them.  Urge all your students to read and discuss this book and they will begin to view the entire bar preparation process as one of empowerment rather than the needlessly difficult hazing ritual that many see it as.  (How bar takers see the process often determines how engaged they are in it, and in turn how success they are in the end.) Following the many chapters filled with concrete advice such as strategies for avoiding distractions and how to enlist the support of family and friends (and knowing the difference between supporters and saboteurs) will help your students to deal with the many “life” challenges that prevent today’s students from doing the work that needs to be done to pass the exam.  The books focus on both traditional and non-traditional law students will also provide immense support, validation, and assistance to your diversity students, part-time or returning students, and students who have extensive family or work obligations outside of law school.
  • Prospective law students. This book should help balance some of the negatives you may hear about legal education so that you see that despite the great challenges there are enormous rewards. A legal education remains the standard bearer in forming minds that are capable of solving the complex problems facing society today.  When people or businesses face problems, they turn to lawyers.  In addition to practicing law, lawyers run businesses and government, they are entrepreneurs and innovators, they are called in to resolve crises (to arbitrate, mediate, and get people back on track), and they engage in countless sorts of strategic planning efforts that help avoid costly problems to begin with. Hopefully the book helps you   decide to go to law school. If you do, the text and tips will help you succeed in school as much as on the bar exam. The book will help you start good habits from day one.
  • Experienced attorneys who work with new lawyers. This book will help you understand some of the concerns facing prospective law clerks and new associates. It may assist you in becoming a stronger mentor and more effectively integrate new lawyers into law practice. Today’s attorneys face generational divides. There are challenges for Baby Boomers managing new graduates from the millennial generation. There are also more second and third career law students which means as experienced lawyers you may find yourselves supervising newbies who are older than you. The legal world is also more diverse than ever. Tolerance and the ability to see things from different perspectives will be an increasingly critical asset.
  • Students from high school to graduate schools of all varieties who are working to achieve any academic goal.  Much of the stress and many of the challenges described here are not unique to law or the bar exam. As you read, just replace the words, “passing the bar exam” with whatever your goal is and you will find useful success strategies for academic goals such as
    • Doing well on final exams or midterms,
    • Getting a high score on the SAT, LSAT, MCAT, medical boards, or other standardized test, or
    • Completing most any professional training.

Practical tips to help your focus during finals

Some of you will soon face final exams.  How do you concentrate when not everyone around you is as serious as you are about doing well on exams?  It’s hard to motivate with the sunshine out, and especially if anyone around you seems to be playing or having fun while you’re “stuck” studying.  Remember, it’s only a couple of weeks.  (Well, if you happen to be studying for the bar exam right after finals, it’s a little bit longer stretch.  But, even the two months will fly.  Read Pass the Bar Exam for all the tips you need!)

Most important, try to see the “study glass” as half full.  You are not “stuck” studying; you get to study.  It’s an incredible gift to be able to sit quietly in a safe place and learn.  It sounds corny, but it’s really true.  You are on the path to help yourself to do well and to do good.

Here are some practical tips to help your focus during finals:

1. Pick a study spot. Maybe it’s the library, maybe it’s s a coffee shop, maybe it’s your home.  Wherever it is,  make sure it’s a place you can concentrate where people will not bug you.

 Try studying in a different spot once or twice to see if you are more productive in a different setting.  (For example, some people study in the library but spend more time socializing with friends than studying.  It may be that an office, a home, a public library, or even library in another school at your university may be where you need to hide during finals.)

2. Let your friends and family know you are in finals mode, and tell them when to expect you will be free.  Say “No” to all plans, social invitations, and even to family obligations unless absolutely necessary during the couple of weeks before exams.

If you are a working student with a job outside of school, see if there is any way to take some time off before exams.

 If you have young children or aging parents, plan well ahead of time, think about whether it is possible to arrange for someone reliable to provide the care you usually give, at least to free up some time for you to study.

Saying “No” ahead of time to social invitations frees you up to decide if you feel like you have time to socialize.  If you have put in a good day or evening and want to drop by that party you were invited to, go ahead.  But only after your work is completed.

If after studying you just want to go to sleep, let yourself.  Brain work takes much more energy than most of us realize.  A good friend of mine who was appointed to the bench told me she had never been more tired than in her first months on that job.  There was nothing physically demanding, but she was certain that she was using more brain power than she ever had before.

3. Plan something special to look forward to after finals  –either by yourself or, if you have family or a special someone who will miss you during this intense study time, plan something fun for them to look forward to doing with you after finals are done.

4. Take a social media break, and, don’t answer texts or phone calls while you are studying. Pick a set time (a short break time) in the evenings after studying is over for the day to read messages.

        Again, good luck on finals!  And best wishes for a great summer after exams.

Time Management Tips for Students

As you prepare for finals, consider these tips. .

***Create a Written Schedule. Write out a study plan at the beginning of every month of the semester, and stick to it. Try to plan in at least 3 hours prep time for each hour of class. The three to one ratio is what is often recommended, and can be what you need to really “get it.” Plan in time to write practice exams.

***Be Aware of Your Most productive and Least Productive Hours. Make your active study hours when you are the most awake and alert, and choose more passive tasks when you less productive.  For example, work on completing practice tests when you are wide awake. Listen to recordings of lectures or outlines when you are not as wide awake. Don’t try to read complex material when you are already burned out.  What are these hours?  Depends on your, your body and your schedule.  Your most productive time may be the morning or, for you it might be midnight. Only you know.  Working students: consider getting up an hour earlier and study one hour before work, one hour at lunch, and one hour right after work rather than trying for work 3-5 hours straight after dinner and a full day of work.

***Use Better Materials not just More Materials. Do not buy every outline or study supplement you see. Too much info will distract you, and some of that material is not from reliable sources. Do read a good supplement.  Or watch a reliable video lecture. (For law students, reading through one good hornbook before and after studying your cases and you may find you save time and increase comprehension.) In addition to talking with your professors, you can consult your Library faculty and your Academic Success faculty for suggestions about reliable supplemental materials.

***Flexibility. If your study plan isn’t working (meaning, if you are not learning what you need to), change it. Think about whether the times you are studying are effective.  Is the place conducive to focus?  And, are you working in the most efficient time blocks on each subject your will be tested on?

***Focus. Reduce Distractions. Limit time spent on other things in your life to make more time for studying. Ask yourself what you can give up, and give up some other things.

***Capturing time. Use commute time (for ex., listen to podcasts, make recordings of yourself reading rules from your own prepared outlines, etc.,) and listen to them in the car, train or bus.  Use exercise time -listen to lectures on a walk or run or bike ride.  Use family and friends time –write flashcards and have willing family members or friends help quiz you. (Younger kids love to quiz their parents!)  Use meal time –form study groups with classmates and talk cases over lunch or dinner, i.e. combine studying with a meal).

***Sleep. Eat well. Exercise.  Do not cheat yourself out of too much sleep. More sleep will make your study time more efficient. Chances are you don’t absorb or retain what you try to “read” when your eyes are half shut and glazing over. Stay alert, and be efficient.  Eating healthy foods will keep your brain on high power.  And, exercise will provide a release valve for your stress while boosting energy for your studies.

***Consistency. Better to give one hour to studying every day than to try to do a seven hour Sunday and nothing all week. Do not plan on just cramming for finals; prepare consistently all semester.

Good luck on finals and throughout your education!

The Secret to Law School Exams: It’s not always about being “right.”

Grading law school exams, I am frequently struck by the idea that I’d like to impress upon students: you don’t always have to have the right answer. Rather, your goal is often just to give reasoned arguments as to how both sides would resolve the issues.  There may not even be a “right” answer on a law school exam. Think about it, there is usually a “P” and a “D” in every story –often working from the same or similar facts (at least on law essays) and each believing he/she is right.  (Each side may draw different inferences from the facts.)  In a funny way, law essays mirror life –there are often at least two sides to every story.

Bottom line, complete many practice exams as you prepare for finals. Learn the law well, and get the best handle you can on the exam process.  And lift off that burden of having to “know” who is “right.”  It makes being a law student so much easier, and way more fun.

Keep up the hard work.  And, good luck on finals!

Studying during Thanksgiving Weekend

Finals are just around the corner.  Now is the time for the big push.  Pull the semester together, take practice tests, sleep well, eat right, exercise, and get ready for “battle” (fighting as hard as you can to do well on your exams.)

But everyone around you is watching sports, shopping, eating, or sleeping off the food comas from the delicious meals.  How to motivate?

  • Take a walk.  Exercise stimulates your brain.
  • Drink lots of water.
  • Make a list of everything you have to do between now and your last final.  Schedule the time you need to study, complete papers, etc.  And, allocate about 3 times as much time for each task as you think it will take. Then chunk projects down into component parts.
  • Pick one work project on today’s schedule and complete it.  Cross it off the list.  Don’t think about the 12 things you have to do today.  Start with one thing.  Complete that and move on to the next item.
  • If you cannot focus on another project right away, take another short walk, or a short nap.  Then, pick up the next project.
  • Find a comfortable place to read, without distractions.  Avoid multi-tasking.  Set social media “office hour” —only checking once a day or once every other day.
  • Lose the FOMO.  Everything you might miss out on in the next couple of weeks is nothing compared to what you might miss out on later if the results of your distractions are a lower GPA.
  • Keep handy the phrase, “Great!  Let’s plan that in January” as a reply to anyone who asks you to do anything before finals.
  • Plan something fun to celebrate when finals are over.  It’s only a couple of weeks away.

Turn “set backs” into leaps forward: what did you want last semester that you did not get. Seize it now!

Today I blogged for readers who just found out that they failed the bar exam. The same sad, angry, and frustrated feelings occur when we experience other kinds of “set back” and the same opportunities to learn from the past and succeed going forward present themselves. Seize them!

  • Did you get lower grades than you wanted this year?   Get on a mission to figure out how to get better grades going forward.  Talk to professors, classmates who did well, review your old exams.  Figure out what you did and did not do and how to change your patterns to achieve better results next time.
  • Did you not get a job or internship you wanted?   Ask people on the hiring committee very politely if you could have just a few minutes of their time to find out how you can improve your resume, cover letter, or interviewing presence.  Find out what they were looking for and see how that differs from what you gave them.  Talk with experts in your career services center.  Show them your resume.  And, begin applying for other jobs implementing some of the new strategies you are learning.  
  • Did not get on that fitness routine you promised yourself?  Problem solve.  Figure out what stopped you.  Did you just not make time?  Calendar time to exercise as if it were a date with the person you want to see more than anyone on the planet, or as if it were an appointment with a specialist that you waited months to see.  Or did you expect too much, do too much at first and feel sore and defeated?  Start slowly. Just find time for a short walk today.  Then, build up to a longer more robust routine.
  • Did not get to dabble in online learning tools. Perhaps you are a professor and just finished a great semester where you taught many wonderful things but did not get to the learning you had been wanting to do about online tools you have heard might supplement your teaching in new and innovative ways.  Make this summer your time to learn a bit about distance learning, and how today’s students learn best.

So, if you are a law student, read this post as is.  But if you are not a law student, substitute the words “failed bar exam” for any other “set back” you recently experienced and problem solve about turning that into a powerful step forward in the future.  The same sorts of struggles and potential triumphs will most likely apply in some important ways to you.
Failed the bar exam? Re-frame this “set back” as an empowering opportunity to learn to succeed going forward.)

Bottom line, we all know the phrase turning “lemons into lemonade,” let’s try today to turn last year’s “set backs” into leaps forward for next year!