How to Ask for an Extension

So around finals time, we frequently find students asking for extensions, make-up exams, or other special circumstances.  I don’t know about others, but I have four criteria for what I consider a legitimate excuse:

  1. a reasonable excuse,
  2. supported by evidence,
  3. delivered politely,
  4. in a timely manner.

Let’s look at these.

  1. What is reasonable?  A medical emergency, a death in the family, that sort of thing.  A leisure tip is not a reasonable excuse in my book, nor is being tired or overwhelmed.  Read the syllabus on day one and calendar everything that is due well ahead of time. (Note: some professors are OK with other excuses; different people have different rules
  2. Supported by evidence?  Bring a doctor’s note or other document that backs up your excuse.  Not that we don’t trust you, but we may have to support our decision to grant you some exception to a rule that others have to follow.  It’s much easier for us to answer administrative concerns if you provide a doctor’s note, documents to prove the death, etc.
  3.  Delivered politely?  When I shared my list of four recently with school administrators, they were surprised.  Why?  So many people are rude and/or demanding.  But, this is an essential element of a valid request.  Say “Please.”  Address your professor as “Professor” –not “Hey” or “Dude” or “Mr.” or “Ms.”  And, ask, do not demand.
  4. Timely?  The earlier in advance the better.  Students who come in as soon as something happens, or in advance if it’s something that can be planned, are well served.  A student who comes in weeks or even months after a midterm, let’s say, and only then asks for a make up exam, loses all credibility.

When I shared my list of four recently with certain school administrators, they were surprised, especially by my insistence on respect.  But, asking politely to me seems the minimum when speaking to or writing to a professor.

The best plan, as always, is to calendar all deadlines at the beginning of the semester and comply with them.  But, sometimes things happen that are beyond your control.  What is within your control is how you handle them.

Follow these rules and you are on the road toward a successful request for an exception to the rules.

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