Monthly Archives: March 2020

In the Age of Coronavirus: Online Teaching Resources –a growing list

All posts on this blog are my own; they do not represent any institution.

Compiling list below with resources for online teaching and learning, from messages exchanged by faculty as the nation’s law schools have gone online, overnight. Recalling a 2008 interview in the California Bar Journal, December 2008: “The curriculum includes live classes, assigned reading, video lectures, essays and tests in 11-day modules. “Other than eye contact and body language, the discussion is, in many ways, quite similar to that of a traditional law school classroom,” said Concord professor Sara Berman. And Berman, a UCLA School of Law graduate herself, sees advantages to a virtual classroom: The interaction is based solely on the discussion’s content, not on the student’s gender, race or looks, for example. Students don’t have to commute. They can review archived classes. And they gain extra experience in written communication.”  

—-

Miscellaneous Resources on Online Teaching and Learning*

*Not endorsing any of the resources below; just listing them.

https://www.cali.org/books/distance-learning-legal-education-design-delivery-and-recommended-practices (published guide.)

https://www.law.du.edu/online-learning-conference/conference-schedule  (Videos embedded in conference schedule)

https://taxprof.typepad.com/taxprof_blog/2020/03/assessment-in-online-law-school-classes.html

 

Thoughts for Law Professors Contemplating Moving to Virtual Classes, By Allie Robbins, March 10, 2020, https://passingthebar.blog/author/smashthebar/

https://lawprofessors.typepad.com/academic_support/2020/03/online-learning-resources-and-tips.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+typepad%2Fxoma+%28Law+School+Academic+Support+Blog%29

 

 

https://www.chronicle.com/interactives/advice-online-teaching

Will update list, and again, not endorsing any of the above resources.

All posts on this blog are my own; they do not represent any institution.

In the Age of Corona: Pandemic Playlist

All posts on this blog are my own; they do not represent any institution.

     The present state of the world, in pandemic, reminds us that we are all connected, and we are all in this together.  For that reason, my current playlist includes a set of recordings by many different artists the world over called, “Playing for Change” –songs around the world. Here are just some of many Playing for Change songs:

  • One Love/Playing for Change
  • A Change is Gonna Come/Playing for Change
  • The Weight/Playing for Change
  • La Bamba/Playing for Change
  • Clandestino/Playing for Change
  • Redemption Song/Playing for Change
  • Lean on Me/Playing for Change
  • What’s Going On/Playing for Change
  • Ripple/Playing for Change
  • Down By the Riverside/Playing for Change
  • Sitting on the Dock of the Bay/Playing for Change
  • Higher Ground/Playing for Change
  • Imagine/Playing for Change
  • Gimme Shelter/Playing for Change
  • Take me Home Country Roads/Playing for Change
  • Stand By Me/Playing for Change
  • Words of Wonder/Get Up Stand Up/Playing for Change
  • Rivers of Babylon/Playing for Change
  • Pata Pata/Playing for Change
  • Listen to the Music/Playing for Chane
  • Everyday People/Playing for Change

For more info, from Wikipedia: “Playing For Change was founded in 2002 by Mark Johnson and Whitney Kroenke.[1][2] Producers Johnson and Enzo Buono traveled around the world to places including New OrleansBarcelonaSouth AfricaIndiaNepal, the Middle East and Ireland. Using mobile recording equipment, the duo recorded local musicians performing the same song, interpreted in their own style.  Among the artists participating or openly involved in the project are Vusi MahlaselaLouis Mhlanga,Clarence BekkerDavid Guido PietroniTal Ben Ari (Tula), BonoKeb’ Mo’David BrozaManu ChaoGrandpa ElliottKeith RichardsToots Hibbert from Toots & the MaytalsTaj Mahal and Stephen Marley.[3][4][5]  This resulted in the documentary A Cinematic Discovery of Street Musicians that won the Audience Award at theWoodstock Film Festival in September 2008.[6][7]Mark Johnson was walking in Santa Monica, California, when he heard the voice of Roger Ridley (deceased in 2005)[8]singing “Stand By Me“; it was this experience that sent Playing For Change on its mission to connect the world through music.[9] The founders of Playing For Change created the Playing For Change Foundation, a separate 501(c)3 nonprofit organization.”

The Age of Corona Virus: July Bar Exam??

All posts on this blog are my own; they do not represent any institution.

A group of us who have been involved in lawyer licensing and legal education for many years lay out options for bar admission in the current context at https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=3559060.

 

The Age of Corona Virus –Gratitude

All posts on this blog are my own; they do not represent any institution.

In tough times, people sometimes show the brightest colors.  It has been great connecting with all sorts of people who are struggling, and fearful –many of whom are entirely alone.  A while back, I shared a gratitude pact with a new friend, texting at least three things each day that unexpected made us smile.  Here are some things I am grateful for today:

  • The smiles on the faces of the local shopkeepers who are staying open to feed the community, despite risks to themselves;
  • A notice that volunteers are ready to help those who cannot leave with groceries and urgent errands;
  • Succulent smells from windows of those who are cooking in instead of Sunday brunching out;
  • Cherry blossoms and springtime weather;
  • Colleagues banding together in “free” time to offer thoughtful researched solutions to the toughest of challenges;
  • Listening to the voices of those who seek to reassure;
  • The way so many of us can remain virtually connected and are doing so creatively;
  • The resourcefulness of loved ones doing without, yet finding ways to make do.

The Age of Corona Virus –One Week In and the World has Gone Online

Blog post is my own and does not represent any institution.

I began blogging a decade ago when I was a senior faculty member and assistant dean at the nation’s first fully online law school, founded with legal education pioneers just before the turn of the 21st century. I taught law school online and online bar review for two decades before migrating to more traditional law schools and to the nonprofit world.

My early blog posts centered around helping law students to form and maintain positive growth mindsets, preparing for and achieving success during law school and while studying for and passing the bar exam.  Eventually, they became the foundation for what is now Bar Exam Success: A Comprehensive Guide, (Bar Exam Success: A Comprehensive Guide (for law students with audio book) –a book I hope will continue to infuse optimism and a host of practical tools to help students succeed in the face of the today’s many great and unforeseen challenges.

This past week, thousands of law professors began a crash course in online teaching.  I have never been more proud of legal education –and I have been an unapologetic advocate for legal education my entire career.

Law faculty nationwide have joined teachers the world over, adapting overnight, bringing content, energy, wisdom, and collaborative spirit to shaken students. In many instances, faculty are teaching much more about survival, connectedness, and how to stick together during times of crisis than they are even about their individual subjects.  Learning is hampered (understatement) when students are consumed by fear; thus, professors stepping up to provide reassurance will continue to be an essential part of teaching in our new world.

And, how law faculty have united in supporting one another!  Last week, law faculty were posting detailed instructions on Zoom, voice-over power points, and even how to conduct moot court and oral arguments online.  They answered each other’s questions at all hours of the day and night, freely sharing tips and strategics for success. They were each other’s moral support and tech support –on top of the extraordinary work being done by actual law school and university IT departments and law librarians (often tech experts in their own right).  Everyone pitched in.

The word “heartwarming” doesn’t begin to express the depths of my admiration and appreciation.  Law schools are essential to a nation governed by the rule of law.  We will need new lawyers more than even in the months and years to come. Lawyers will need to step in to help individuals, small and large businesses, and government agencies to rebuild.

As we move through this crisis, into entirely uncharted waters, let us strive to continue full support for one another, and pledge an unwavering commitment to education and the arts (more on that in future posts), which have persisted even in the most heavily war-torn societies.

We need education more than ever in our time of crisis.  Let us do whatever is necessary to continue supporting those who are teaching our future workforce.  We will need today’s students (tomorrow’s leaders) to be as informed as possible –and we will need them to be nimble and ethical critical thinkers.

All posts on this blog are my own; they do not represent any institution.